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Nil Admirari no Tenbin: Kuroyuri En’youtan – Twin Pack

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Latest on Nil Admirari no Tenbin: Kuroyuri En’youtan – Twin Pack ,Sign In to follow. Follow Nil Admirari no Tenbin: Kuroyuri En’youtan – Twin Pack, and we’ll let you know when we have any news, trailers, or screenshots. Most Recent Forum Activity No forum topics for Nil Admirari no Tenbin: Kuroyuri En’youtan – Twin Pack […]

Dishonored: Death of the Outsider Review

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Tying up loose ends in a series focused on political intrigue and all things metaphysical can’t be easy. In Dishonored: Death Of The Outsider–a stand-alone game capping off the events of Dishonored 2–it covers the exploits of various side-characters on a more personal quest, that doesn’t overstay its welcome. Arkane Studios continues its tradition of coming up with an incredibly inventive and cunning game about elusive assassins making their mark on the world around them, while choosing where and when to make the tough choices.

Set several months after Dishonored 2, Emily Kaldwin and Corvo Attano have since left the isle of Karnaca, leaving Billie Lurk to return to her old ways to track down her former mentor Daud. Pulling from her skills working under the master assassin, they form a plan to confront The Outsider, a deity of the Void realm and instigator of events throughout the series. Billie Lurk will use her newfound powers to sneak, loot, and track down key targets to find a way to eliminate the demigod once and for all.

Much like the previous games, Death Of The Outsider makes effective use of large, open levels. With each city block holding a number of side-opportunities and events, there is plenty to learn and uncover during your excursions. Billie’s story aims to round out the narrative presented in both Dishonored games, but the general flow is somewhat lacking. While starting strong, the story eventually runs out of steam, with its final missions falling a bit flat. With that said, there are many details packed in for Dishonored fans, revealing important notes that flesh out the events since the last game.

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Billie’s approach is a bit different compared to the exploits of Corvo, Emily, and Daud. With no mark bestowed from the Outsider, she is free from the Demigod’s watchful gaze, and isn’t judged by her overall actions throughout the story. This helps to set the tone for what players can expect in Death Of The Outsider. With the lack of the Chaos System from previous games, the moral ambiguity of the story matches the gameplay, allowing her to go about missions in different and inventive ways–often going for a more improvised style that blends lethal and non-lethal moves.

I tend to be more stealth focused when playing a stealth-action games, and dread the moments when having to mash the reload save key to avoid dealing with lost resources and the bloody mess I left behind. In this game, getting caught isn’t as punishing, allowing you to recover from a messy job. With your overall performance graded after each mission–judging times detected, hostiles killed, and items found–you’ll be able to focus more on being an effective assassin, without the added pressure of an overarching meta system keeping you in-check.

With gear including lethal and non-lethal darts and mines, grenades, and a stealthy sword–including powers that assist with traversal and the manipulation of your enemies–how you go about your mission is up to you. As an immersive sim, each character and object in the game space can be manipulated, opening up some rather interesting gameplay opportunities–like baiting enemies with thrown bottles to walk into traps, or some more creative options like using the Semblance power to mimic the appearance of others to get the jump on targets.

In a lot of ways, this stand-alone release’s more relaxed style does more to compliment the series’ immersive sim design compared to its predecessors.

Billie Lurk’s overall repertoire of skills are much more lean compared to the other characters. Though Corvo and Emily had a sizable pool of powers, the Captain of the Dreadful Wale has just three, along with a side ability to Rat Whisper–where she can hear the thoughts of nearby rodents to learn clues and tidbits about the characters in the area. With no mark, Billie’s powers work on recharging mana, a more than welcome addition that gets rid of mana potions. Despite the smaller pool of powers, she can still acquire and craft a set of Bone Charms to amplify her various skills and attributes.

Focusing on the key areas of traversal, recon, and subterfuge–her powers cover the gamut of what players will need throughout their missions. One power in particular named Foresight, allows Billie to project herself as a spectre to scout and mark targets. This skill is a standout, proving its usefulness time and again when locating Bone Charms and key items. However, the fact that there is only three powers can make the overall gameplay potential feel limited compared to previous games. While creative players can certainly make the best of it, it was disappointing to see that these were all you get. However, completing the game once will unlock the Original Game + mode, replacing Billie’s original powers with Blink, Domino, and Dark Vision from Dishonored 2–bringing back a feeling of familiarity.

Dishonored’s AI systems are as sharp as ever, and will require some planning to get through unscathed–but going in at full force isn’t discouraged if that’s your thing. With the more lax gameplay systems on display, there’s much more incentive to experiment with the tools at your disposal. During one segment, I used Foresight to mark several targets before using a combination of electric mines and the Disperse teleport ability to plant traps during their patrol routes, disabling several guards within seconds as I slipped away with valuable loot.

Only taking about 7 hours to clear on the normal setting, there are several missions that beg for a revisit, such as the mission to infiltrate Karnaca’s Bank–resulting in one of the series’ most finely tuned levels. One feature brought in to add more variety are the new contracts found in the Black Market, where you can also buy items and upgrade your gear. Billie can take on a selection of side-jobs from the citizens in Karnaca, ranging from the bizarre, such as killing an annoying mime and making it look like an accident, to the more morbid–like getting revenge on a sadistic doctor who experiments on his patients.

Surprisingly, Death Of The Outsider channels much more of the spirit of classic stealth-action games like the original Thief. Giving room to experiment and prod aspects of the environment to see what works, without too many distractions from the story. Along with a custom game mode, allowing you to tune the game’s AI, fail-states, and add in other odd and challenging options like Ironman Mode–Death of the Outsider gives you a number of ways to define the type of stealth-action game you want to play. In a lot of ways, this stand-alone release’s more relaxed style does more to compliment the series’ immersive sim design compared to its predecessors.

Dishonored: Death Of The Outsider is a solid, inventive, yet somewhat subdued capper to the stories from the previous Dishonored games. While the smaller scope can be felt throughout, the approach to allowing players to express themselves as a master assassin is just as strong as ever. It’s uncertain where the series can go from here, but this stand-alone release proves that Dishonored is still a remarkably designed stealth-action game with much potential, that offers players the chance to be creative in ways they’d least expect.



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Tying up loose ends in a series focused on political intrigue and all things metaphysical can’t be easy. In Dishonored: Death Of The Outsider–a stand-alone game capping off the events of Dishonored 2–it covers the exploits of various side-characters on a more personal quest, that doesn’t overstay its welcome. Arkane Studios continues its tradition of […]

Check Out This Ni No Kuni 2 Trailer From Tokyo Game Show – News

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During Sony’s TGS press conference, a trailer for Level 5 and Bandai Namco’s Ni no Kuni 2 played with mostly new footage.

Set one hundred years after the original game, Ni no Kuni 2 tells the story of a war between cat and mouse tribes. The mouse tribe usurps the throne held by the cat tribe, exiling boy king protagonist Evan Tildrum, who undertakes a quest to get his castle back from the mice.

Check out the trailer below and look out for Ni no Kuni 2 on PlayStation 4 and PC on January 19, 2018.



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During Sony’s TGS press conference, a trailer for Level 5 and Bandai Namco’s Ni no Kuni 2 played with mostly new footage. Set one hundred years after the original game, Ni no Kuni 2 tells the story of a war between cat and mouse tribes. The mouse tribe usurps the throne held by the cat […]

Valve Announces Dota 2 Custom Game Contest With $30,000 Prize

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Frostivus 2017 is on, but Valve needs some assistance from the community.

The Winter season is fast approaching, which for Dota 2 fans means wondering if Valve has prepared any special in-game events for the holiday season. It has been years since Valve has put on a winter holiday event for Dota 2, and this year they are relegating responsibility to the community, offering up a $30,000 for a custom game they can use for their 2017 Frostivus event.

Today, in a post on the Dota 2 Blog, Valve announced Frostivus is coming back via a custom game contest. Creators will have until November 20th to create and submit a game that is “heavily themed around the Frostivus season.” The game can be either competitive or cooperative, but must be multiplayer and must be an original concept (to avoid re-skinning of older games). Valve recommends playtesting your game with the community prior to submitting, or at least involve the community in development to receive feedback. The creator (or creators) of the winning game will receive $30,000 from Valve and will presumably see their game used officially as a part of the Frostivus 2017 festivities.

In addition to announcing the custom game contest, Valve also had some new info on The Dueling Fates update, which we previously reported on here. According to the post, the update is still in development, but should be finished in a little over a month. Valve also included a teaser for the next episode of True Sight, its Dota 2 documentary series.

Frostivus was a yearly Dota 2 event put on by Valve, which featured special holiday game modes and items for players to enjoy during the winter season. Valve hasn’t held a Frostivus event since 2013, but the fans haven’t forgotten and still hope for it to be revived each year. With the addition of custom games in 2015’s Dota Reborn update, most assumed we would see more events, but Valve has only released three custom games since their introduction.

Sam Stewart is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter




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Share. Frostivus 2017 is on, but Valve needs some assistance from the community. By Sam Stewart The Winter season is fast approaching, which for Dota 2 fans means wondering if Valve has prepared any special in-game events for the holiday season. It has been years since Valve has put on a winter holiday event for […]

New Releases – Top Games Out This Week – September 17 – New Releases

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Where Is Xur In Destiny 2? Location And Exotics He’s Selling Revealed

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For the first time since the release of Destiny 2, Xur the mysterious vendor that appears each week selling exotic weapons, armor, and other items, has arrived. This week, the Agent of the Nine can be found on Nessus, hanging out at the top of the map in the area marked Watcher’s Grave.

In a change from the first game, an icon showing where Xur is appears on the map and can be tracked to make getting to him easier. Once you’re in the Watcher’s Grave, look up and you’ll find him standing atop a tree. In exchange for your Legendary Shards, he’ll sell you the items in the list below.

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  • Merciless: Fusion Rifle — 29 Legendary Shards
  • Raiden Flux: Chest Armor (Hunter Class) — 23 Legendary Shards
  • Doom Fang Pauldron: Gauntlets — 23 Legendary Shards
  • Wings of Sacred Dawn: Chest Armor (Warlock) — 23 Legendary Shards

Generally, the response to Xur’s offerings hasn’t been positive as the items he’s selling are available as loot drops fairly early in the game. The standout item is the Merciless fusion rifle, so grab that if you haven’t got one already.

In other Destiny 2 news, the game’s first raid, Leviathan, is out now. For everything you need to know about, check out GameSpot’s in-depth Raid guide. Bungie has also said it is expecting to release the next update for Destiny 2 next week. In the studio’s latest weekly blog post, it said this update–1.0.1.3–will address “some known issues.” One of these is the “harmful imagery” that players recently discovered.

Looking further ahead, Bungie will also support Destiny 2 will paid expansion content, the first of which, Curse of Osiris, is reportedly coming out in December. Alongside Xur, the first Trials of the Nine event is also now live.



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For the first time since the release of Destiny 2, Xur the mysterious vendor that appears each week selling exotic weapons, armor, and other items, has arrived. This week, the Agent of the Nine can be found on Nessus, hanging out at the top of the map in the area marked Watcher’s Grave. In a […]

The History of 2D Metroid Games

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2D Metroid is back. Samus Returns marks the first new 2D Metroid in 13 years. So let’s celebrate by talking a look back at Metroid’s history.



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2D Metroid is back. Samus Returns marks the first new 2D Metroid in 13 years. So let’s celebrate by talking a look back at Metroid’s history. Source link

Into the Rhythm VR

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Into the Rhythm VR



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ARK: Survival Evolved Review – GameSpot

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After a couple of dozen hours exploring the dinosaur survival simulation from developer Studio Wildcard, I’ve barely scratched the surface of what is both an impressive achievement and a deeply frustrating experience. One moment I was beaming over how I was able to slap together a hut on the beach and start a fire to keep warm during a long and spooky prehistoric night. The next I was swearing until I was out of breath after being killed yet again by a Dilophosaurus or a pack of Compys or a Titanoboa or whatever else decided to roar out of the jungle for a snack.

This is a pure, hardcore survival game where you’re dropped in your tighty whities on a beach by beings unknown (UFO-like monoliths float in the sky) with the sole goal of figuring out how to stay alive. Land and sea are populated with all sorts of dinosaurs and other assorted prehistoric creatures, ranging from the milquetoast Dodos and Moschops to aggressive predators like the Spinosaurus, the Megapiranha, the Troodon, the Raptor, and much, much more. So not only are you stuck essentially naked with nothing other than your wits to keep you breathing, just about everything stuck here with you has big pointy teeth and zero qualms about using them to rip you to pieces.

That said, there isn’t much of a learning curve. Everything is based on a hunter-gatherer system where you collect resources by killing animals for their hides and meat and other goodies, and by chopping down trees, smashing up rocks, and scavenging in the jungle for wood, stone, flint, berries, fiber, and more. Leveling up–which happens fast and frequently throughout the game to keep things interesting–provides points used to purchase engrams that serve as plans for all of the survival gear that you can make. You start with caveman stuff like stone axes, thatch huts, ragged clothing, and campfires, but soon progress to compasses, spyglasses, bows and arrows, wood structures, gunpowder, and more. Stick with things long enough and you move into the modern era with rifles and radios.

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Another major component of Ark is the ability to train dinos. Carefully combining knocking out your prey with feeding them results in tame creatures that can be ridden around the landscape and even bred. It’s something of a tedious affair involving a fair bit of gathering different types of food and waiting around, but it’s well worth it in the end as you can wind up with mounts far better at fighting other dinosaurs than you can with your puny fists and weapons. Toss in a wide range of crafting and that steadily increasing engram tech, and you’ve got an impressive sandbox in which to play.

All of this can be experienced either solo or together with other players on multiplayer servers that can be designated either PVE, where players cannot kill one another, and PVP, where they can, and there are basically no rules at all. Ark has been built around a tribal model, though, where playing cooperatively feels generally like the prescribed way to go.

Single-player does have its benefits, namely in that you avoid messy interactions with fellow human players. But going solo comes at the cost of cranking difficulty through the roof and forcing you to do everything for yourself. You have to become a one-man tribe to get anything done, and I found the process of chopping trees, hacking stone, and gathering assorted things in the brush to be a repetitive process. While you level up fairly quickly and add new engrams on a regular basis, it’s not exactly thrilling to spend all of your time mindlessly pushing buttons to accumulate one stockpile after another.

Of course, playing alone also means that you have to fight dinosaurs mano-a-mano. This means that you die. A lot. The game thankfully stocks the default areas where you spawn (generally coastal beach regions) with wussier, almost cattle-like creatures that can be farmed to get you started collecting meat and skins. But aggressive carnivores are never far away. The landscape is dotted with creatures that you have almost zero chance at killing or escaping, especially in the early hours.

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This outstanding sense of place and mood is offset by the sheer difficulty of everything that you have to do, the spectacular amounts of time necessary to experience even a tenth of what the game has to offer, and the randomness of death constantly destroying everything that you have built.

As a result, Ark does not make a great first impression. I was routinely slaughtered by Dilophosauruses on the beaches, gangs of Compys in the jungle, random Trodoons nearly everywhere, and even a positively brutal Spinosaurus that somehow managed to spawn in not far from where I began my game. Whenever I thought I was making progress, wham, along came a Raptor or something equally frightening to remind me of my place in the food chain. Even the water offered me no respite, as every little stream seemed to be well stocked with Megapiranhas and Sabertooth Salmon. These killer fish actually gave me my first wake-up call as to how brutal Ark was going to be. I finished my first thatch house and decided to start really exploring territory, starting with a quick swim across the bay. I didn’t get halfway across before I was eaten alive.

The only good thing being killed is that your stuff gets packed into a bag and left at the point of your demise, ready to be picked up by your respawned self. This is easier said than done, however, as the early-game’s random respawns generally place you a long way from where you died. And you have a limited amount of time to grab everything before it vanishes forever. Even worse, whatever killed you often hangs around the pack, as if it’s guarding the treasure trove in the knowledge that somebody is coming back for it. Other times, your gear is simply inaccessible. I don’t think I ever reclaimed my gear after being killed in the water, as those packs always wound up in the midst of schools of fish with steak-knife teeth.

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In a perfect world, playing the multiplayer version of Ark would solve the above problems. It doesn’t. All of these issues remain present when playing on servers with other people, and other, potentially even more serious annoyances, are introduced. Playing on an established public server means that you’re the new guy, so it doesn’t seem entirely easy to join a tribe. On the PVP servers, you can be an easy target for the more experienced players who enjoy playing serial killer. PVE servers let you relax and work cooperatively, but I saw a lot of people there doing their own thing exactly as they would have in the solo game. So aside from the social aspect of trying to stay alive in dino-land with the help of fellow human beings, I didn’t really see the point.

There is something majestic about Ark’s addictive and incredibly atmospheric design. I’ve never been so invested in the protagonist’s predicament, especially when huddling around a fire in the middle of the night or when facing off with a dinosaur that was stalking me, and the sense of being so utterly alone really sank in.

Still, this outstanding sense of place and mood is offset by the sheer difficulty of everything that you have to do, the spectacular amounts of time necessary to experience even a tenth of what the game has to offer, and the randomness of death constantly destroying everything that you have built. None of these things can exactly be considered flaws, as the designers surely intended the game to play like this, at least for the most part. But all of these factors also make Ark an acquired taste that requires a strong level of commitment that is not for everyone, probably myself included.



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After a couple of dozen hours exploring the dinosaur survival simulation from developer Studio Wildcard, I’ve barely scratched the surface of what is both an impressive achievement and a deeply frustrating experience. One moment I was beaming over how I was able to slap together a hut on the beach and start a fire to […]